Migration concentration

August 7, 2018

Migration concentration

Julia Rijssenbeek
August 7, 2018

Migration concentration

Julia Rijssenbeek
August 7, 2018
Migration concentration
Julia Rijssenbeek
Maya Turolla
August 7, 2018
Syrian refugee camp in the outskirts of Athens. Photo courtesy of Julia Ricard. © Unsplash.

What happened?

The number of conflict refugees worldwide has reached a world record of 1% of the world population. According to the 2018 Global Peace Index, that shows that the world is less peaceful now than it was over the last 10 years. With the influx of migrants to Europe following the Syrian crisis, the 2015-2016 migration crisis led to many political tensions and is still causing stress within and between nations. Recently, after a populist anti-immigration coalition took office, Italy refused to offer safe harbor to a rescue ship carrying 629 migrants, giving rise to a diplomatic debate between the country and the EU. In July, Austria’s anti-immigration government will make migration the centerpiece of its half-year presidency of the EU.

What does this mean?

When the number of conflict refugees surges, data on migration are often used as political tools. Concerns over “invasions” of refugees, for example, contributed to the election of Donald Trump and swayed Brexit voters. Nature made the case that data show the situation in 2017 was different from how it was often portrayed and that international migration tracking can be messy and ambiguous. Furthermore, although it is commonly believed that the volume of international migration of any kind has increased, research shows that this belief is largely untested and that global migration patterns in the period of 1960-2000 challenge this idea. However, the study also shows that the origins and the destinations of migrants have changed. The range of countries people are fleeing from has become wider and the range of countries people are fleeing to has become narrower. Wealthier countries attract the most migrants (Switzerland, Germany, Austria, and the U.K., as well as Scandinavia, have surplus migration). As such, the volume of migrants may increase at a smaller number of hubs. Furthermore, it is easier than ever before to travel long-distances. And thus, if conflicts increase, this will impact countries far away, as the wave of Syrian refugees in Europe has shown.

What's next?

If this trend continues and the number of safe havens that attract immigrants declines further, right-wing governments will increase efforts to keep them out, while others will try to reduce or prevent the conflicts abroad. An analogy can be drawn to the trend of migration on a more local scale: rapid urbanization. Cities can be seen as hubs attracting people from all over the country, the urban-rural rift representing a demarcation between the haves and the have-nots and governments put effort into making it attractive to stay in the countryside, e.g. offering free housing to fight depopulation.

About the author(s)
At FreedomLab, Julia Rijssenbeek focuses on our relationship to nature, sustainable and technological transitions in the food system, and the geopolitics of our global food sytems. She is currently working on her PhD in philosophy of technology at Wageningen University, investigating how synthetic biology might alter philosophical ideas about nature and the values we hold, as well as what a bio-based future may bring.
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